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Platbodem Visserman

£ 82.931 (€ 92.500) VAT Paid
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Do you want to know more? Please contact Tradewind Yachts.

+31(0)114-… Show
Year of construction 1913
Material Steel
Length 40.68 feet
Width 13.5 feet

Unique flatbottom, original for oyster and lobster fishing

Basic data of the Platbodem Visserman

  • Seller:Tradewind Yachts
  • Brand:Unknown
  • Model:Visserman
  • Category:Flat and round bottom
  • Year of construction:1913
  • Material:Steel
  • Experience: A day of boating fun, Family holidays, Large groups aboard, Fast motorboating, Sailing races, Weekendcruiser, weekends aboard
  • Length:40.68 feet
  • Width:13.55 feet
  • Draught:3 feet
  • Variable draught:No
  • Country: Netherlands
  • To view in sales harbour/showroom: Yes
  • Price:£ 82.931 VAT Paid (€ 92.500 VAT Paid)
  • Account Manager: Tradewind Yachts

Documents

General

  • Remarks:

    Unique flat bottom, originally for lobster and oyster fishing.

    In 1911 the building was commissioned after the principal's wooden blower had perished in a storm. The ship was built in a fisherman's version for lobster and oyster fishing. She came in 1913 with a lobster bun from the shipyard as the YE8. After winter 1963/64, when most of the oysters had frozen to death, the ship was shut down. Around 1970 it was sold and put into use as a pleasure craft. From that period is the current structure. The grandson of the client bought the ship back in 1976, after which the current owner acquired her in 1997 and had her fully restored. The hull is authentic except for the bun which has of course been replaced.

    The blower is fuller, heavier and heavier built than the botter, while the mountain wood is much lower. Because the stern of the blower falls much less than that of a blunter, the rudder also differs from that of the blunter, the head is also different, while the back of the rudder at the blower is almost vertical and at the blunter, on the other hand, slopes slightly backwards. The full stern of the blower was indispensable when sailing before the wind on the North Sea.

    The rafters in the stern show a pronounced s-shape, which gives a nice line. So a blazer is 'peaked' from behind. Towards the front, this S-shape gradually evolves into the ordinary convex shape. Konijnenburg speaks of blowers with a full, round stern like a bookier, and calls this with an ugly word the blower model. Usually the blower was only covered in front of the mast; the larger ships had a 'scaffolding' behind the mast and sometimes a deckhouse in the stern. When the fishermen were doing badly, the blower was also used as a cargo ship, to which the bun was drained.


    Seaworthiness

    The seaworthiness of the blower also follows from the fact that it was in use at various salvage companies and proved to be particularly suitable for this often heavy work. The blazer belonged on Texel and Terschelling and in the villages of Wierum, Paesens and Moddergat in the north of Friesland. The Texelaars usually fished in the sea-holes; those from Paesens and Moddergat north of the Wadden Islands. These last blowers were up to 56 feet long, even heavier built and usually had two masts. A fiink rig on these heavy ships was also needed to tow the nets. They fished for cod and haddock with the longline and in the summer months with the scrubbing net for plaice.


    Other places

    Also in the South, as far as the Scheldt near Antwerp, blowers were common, and when the fishermen in the said Frisian villages were hit by heavy disasters in 1883 and 1891, in which more than a hundred men drowned and almost the entire fleet was lost, the remaining ships were sold to Goeree, Stellendam and Ouddorp.


    Build

    The blazer was mainly built in Makkum, at the shipyards of Alkema and Zwolsman. When a member of the Zwolsman family settled in Workum, they were built oak in that place, and also in Hindelopen near the Wybrands shipyard. There's only a few blazers left.


    Click here for more information

  • Shipyard: Gebr. Spaans
    Br. Spanish from Roodevaart
  • Hull number: 1183
  • Draught: 90 cm
  • Maximum draught: 90 cm

Accommodation

  • Berths: fixed: 0

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Platbodem Visserman

Platbodem Visserman

£ 82.931 (€ 92.500) VAT Paid